Gymnastics Skills, Drills, Conditioning in NJ

Gymnastics Training: Skills, Drills, Conditioning…
It’s that time of year… Gymnasts must learn new skills for next season. Are they strong enough? Flexible enough? Fast enough? And is your gymnast learning the correct technique through drills and proper conditioning?
Before your gymnast gets frustrated, develops fears and bad habits, bring them to me… USAG Level 5-Elite, USAIGC, JOGA, High School, College…
Is your gymnast injured? I can help with that. She will NEED specific training to return to competition shape. Besides being a highly experienced gymnastics coach, I am a CSCS, sports performance coach. You can google that to see what it means. There are very few high level gymnastics coaches who also have the CSCS certification.
Read the testimonials!
#gymnastics #sports #training

FOCUS in Gymnastics… It’s a SAFETY Issue!

What’s Behind the Ability to Focus?

Focus is the key to success… But there’s more to it than just thinking about the skill or routine to be performed. What’s behind the ability to focus? Believe it or not, what an athlete does outside the gym is just as important as what they do inside the gym. An athlete’s hydration level, eating habits, sleep quality, and medications greatly effect a gymnast’s training as well as their performance at competitions.

Dehydration… Did you know that by the time you are thirsty you are already dehydrated? Gymnasts may suffer a loss of performance of up to 30% when dehydrated. As little as a 2% loss in fluid will negatively impact your athlete’s body, mind, training, and performance. Mild dehydration can cause confusion, irritability, constipation, drowsiness, fever, thirst. Mild to moderate dehydration symptoms include dry, sticky mouth, muscle weakness, stiff joints, headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, nausea, cramping, decreased urine, cool extremities, slow capillary refill, and sunken eyes. With moderate dehydration your gymnast may experience flushing, low endurance, rapid heart rates, elevated body temperatures, and rapid onset of fatigue. Severe dehydration is the loss of 10-15% of body fluids and is a life-threatening condition that requires immediate medical care. The signs and symptoms of severe dehydration include extreme thirst, irritability and confusion, very dry mouth, dry skin and mucous membranes, lack of sweating, little or no urination, any urine that is produced will be dark yellow, sunken eyes, shriveled and dry skin, rapid heartbeat, fever, coma, and even death.

Dehydration of any kind will not correct itself. It is imperative that your gymnasts drink enough fluid before, during, and after their workout. The good news is that mild to moderate dehydration can usually be reversed by drinking fluids. The bad news is that by the time your gymnast is moderately dehydrated they can lose focus. With a loss of focus your gymnast will be at risk of injury from an accident. The results can be severe to catastrophic. Some accidents and injuries could be avoided simply by drinking plenty of fluids.

Drinking during training is one thing, but if your gymnast has not had enough fluids throughout the day they will walk into the gym dehydrated and already be at risk of severe injury. As coaches, we must encourage our gymnasts to drink enough fluids before, during, and after training. How much fluid should they drink? It is recommended that your gymnast drink the number of ounces in fluid that is equal to half their body weight for each day of normal activities. For example, if your gymnast weighs 100 pounds, their hydration goal would be approximately 50 ounces per day. That is not the same as serious training time. Your gymnast would drink more during intense training. What should your gymnast drink? It is recommended that a sports drink be used for those exercising more than one hour. Athletes NEED the carbohydrates and electrolytes in these drinks to get through training safely. Pro athletes are on Gatorade for a reason, because it works and it is safe. Go to http://www.GSSIWeb.com for more information on hydration research. Don’t want to do Gatorade? Use coconut water!

Nutrition in relation performance. Without enough carbohydrates, your gymnast will not have the energy necessary to safely get through their workout or a competition. When there are not enough carbohydrates in the diet, the energy comes from protein. When your body is forced to use protein for energy, it gets that protein from the muscle. When the body is forced to use energy from muscle on a regular basis it is difficult to gain or maintain strength and muscle mass. The long distance runner is an example of someone whose body uses protein for energy. They have very little muscle mass.  It is counterproductive for a gymnast to allow the body to use protein (muscle) for energy on a regular basis. Gymnasts need energy for training and strength to perform skills and routines. Lack of energy and strength will greatly effect the gymnast’s ability to focus. Lack of focus can result in catastrophic injury. There is not enough space here to completely discuss nutrition, but you can go to Dr Fred Bisci or Dr Joe Kasper’s websites to learn about nutrition.

And finally sleep… We all know how difficult it is to function when we are tired, especially if we did not sleep well for more than one night in a row. How can we expect our gymnasts to perform safely when they do not sleep well? We can’t. Imagine a gymnast learning a new skill or performing a full routine when they have not had enough sleep. Would you be comfortable performing a double back when you are chronically tired? It’s difficult for your gymnast to focus when they are tired and it is extremely dangerous. Your gymnast’s ability to focus and react is diminished when they are sleep deprived. Again, lack of focus can lead to an accident, a catastrophic one. It has been proven with driving tests that people who are tired drive as poorly as those who are under the influence of alcohol. They cannot react as well as those who are well rested. Did you know that it was National Driving While Drowsy Prevention Week in November 2010? That’s how much fatigue effects the ability to focus and react. About one in every six fatal auto accidents in the U.S. is due to driving while drowsy, according to a new study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.  I wonder how many gymnastics accidents are caused because the gymnast was tired due to poor sleeping habits. It is imperative that your gymnast is well rested and able to focus.

Keep in mind that when focus is lost, accidents can and will occur. As coaches we have the responsibility to discuss hydration, nutrition, sleep, and even medication side effects with the parents. It seems that many parents do not realize the direct relation between everyday life and performance during training and/or competition.

So I still say that FOCUS IS THE KEY TO SUCCESS, but more importantly, FOCUS IS THE KEY TO SAFETY. Without proper hydration, nutrition, and sleep our gymnasts will not be able to focus well, putting them at risk. I think we should call these risk factors – hydration, nutrition, and sleep – the SAFETY TRIO. It’s a quick and easy to remember phrase that I just named. The SAFETY TRIO is just as important as all of the drills and conditioning used to prepare our gymnasts for new skills, routines, and competition. Without all of these factors our athletes may be at risk of injury. Best of luck with your training and always keep safety in mind while training.

By Karen Goeller, CSCS
Gymnastics and Fitness Author
http://www.KarenGoeller.com

Click here for info on training with Karen in NJ.

Originally published in 2011 on http://www.GymnasticsStuff.com.

 

 

 

Gymnastics Mental Blocks… Last Minute Training

   I cannot teach your level 8 daughter a yurchenko vault in an hour to compete at states in three days!

   It takes years to develop the strength, flexibility, speed, and technique necessary for that vault. And it takes numerous drills and progressions to learn that vault. Originally only  level 10 and elite gymnasts were allowed to perform that vault. When the vault changed to a table that rule was adjusted, but the risk still exists.

   A level 8 gymnast AFRAID of the vault should NOT be asked to compete it at a state competition. Why would adults ruin a child’s day and have her literally risk her life for scores, especially at level 8? I learned she is already getting a 36AA score, very respectable.  Let her perform the easier vault and enjoy the day!

   This is NOT the Olympics. Let her enjoy her day at states rather than worrying, losing focus, being upset, and likely injuring herself. An injury is not a badge of honor, it’s painful, time consuming, stressful, inconvenient, and expensive.

   People do not realize the risk in the sport because when they see the Olympics on tv those gymnasts make everything look easy. That’s the art of the sport, to make difficult skills LOOK easy. It takes an average ten years of non-stop, intense, appropriate training to get to level 10 and even more to get to elite.

   Parents, you MUST appreciate the risk and stop pushing your kids to do things they are desperately afraid of just for a score or YOUR ego. You could literally kill your child by pushing them like that and I cannot be part of that.

   I am available to help train your children and do have great success with my private clients, but will not do last minute teaching for a state meet. It is NOT the same as cramming for a final exam in school, there are real-life consequences to telling a kid they must perform a dangerous skill at a stressful competition. Injuries happen when focus is compromised by fear, lack of sleep, lack of energy, and dehydration.

   As a parent you should encourage your kids, but you should NOT try to force them to compete skills that they cannot perform comfortably on their own for several months in advance. Remember, it is YOUR kids SAFETY at risk.

   If they are afraid, there is a good reason and they need more time, drills, technique adjustments, and spotting in order to become comfortable with the skill. They also might need more sleep, water, and high quality carbs to stay focused. (Click here for article on focus.)

Click here for info on training with Karen in NJ.

Energy Drinks are DANGEROUS, especially for kids!

I just saw someone post a photo of two little boys about 9-10 years old with energy drinks in their hands. That is NOT what children should be drinking!!!

Look at these 3 websites…

Anything synthetic, generally speaking, is dangerous,” he says. “Energy drinks are a perfect example of that.
https://health.clevelandclinic.org/…/why-energy-drinks-and…/

Although healthy people can tolerate caffeine in moderation, heavy caffeine consumption, such as drinking energy drinks, has been associated with serious consequences such as seizures, mania, stroke, and sudden death…http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/127/3/511

Thousands of kids have faced serious — and potentially deadly — side effects after consuming energy drinks, new research shows… serious side effects, such as seizures, irregular heart rhythms or dangerously high blood pressure, the researchers found.
http://www.livescience.com/48765-energy-drinks-side-effects…

Stress Fractures in Gymnasts

Another gymnast with stress fractures… So sad!

This is the third gymnast that I have seen with stress fractures within the past few months. And I am sure there are many more out there.

I wish these coaches would learn when to push and when to slow things down. Some only know how to push their athletes hard, but do not know when to slow it down. Many are great coaches, but many really do not know how to communicate with gymnasts regarding injuries. As a result, the pain and injuries become worse and healing time becomes longer. No one is happy by that point.

And unfortunately, some coaches see gymnasts as a commodity, NOT as children! They see them as something that will bring in more business when they win at competitions or go off to a great college on scholarship. The competitive gymnasts often make the reputation for the program.

I owned a gymnastics club for ten years, have been coaching since 1978, and have NEVER had a gymnast with a stress fracture. (I’ve been hired in the past to help gyms REDUCE injuries.) My level 6-10 gymnasts trained 24 hours a week and it was nonstop movement in the gym with the exception of water breaks. They progressed rapidly and remained healthy. If I was capable of producing healthy gymnasts so is EVERY other coach out there.

The rule that can be followed is if 3 out of 10 gymnasts, 30%, have pain the the same general area of the body (ankles/feet, wrists/hands, back) the program must be changed. It may be something simple such as a few less push ups or adding a sting mat. Or something drastic may need to be done such as buying new spring beams or more resilient mats. Coaches MUST be more aware and conscientious when training gymnasts. Again, there are so many amazing coaches out there, but there are still too many that are not in tune with what is happening to their gymnasts.

Coaches, please… listen to your gymnasts when they mention pain and discuss it with their parents. It’s better to deal with an injury BEFORE it becomes serious. And it’s better to deal with it completely than to force the gymnast to return to full training too soon.

I am a CSCS AND a gymnastics coach. Parents call me to help their children (gymnasts) regain strength and return to competition after the injures. If you are a parent or coach and need help please reach out to me, 908-278-3756. We all want what is best for the gymnast!

Some reading on stress fractures…

Bony stress reactions and stress fractures are very common in Sports Medicine.  They are considered overuse injuries and usually occur when the amount or intensity of an activity is increased too rapidly.  Initially the involved muscles become fatigued and lose the ability to absorb shock.  This subsequently transfers the load of stress onto the bones, causing injury within their internal structure.https://www.rothmaninstitute.com/specialties/conditions/stress-fractures7

Stress fractures often result from increasing the amount or intensity of an activity too quickly.” http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/stress-fractures/symptoms-causes/dxc-20232156

A stress fracture is an overuse injury. It occurs when muscles become fatigued and are unable to absorb added shock. Eventually, the fatigued muscle transfers the overload of stress to the bone causing a tiny crack called a stress fracture.” http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00112

They also affect people with weak bones or nutritional deficiencies, and can happen in the foot, leg, spine, arm, ribs, and other bony locations.” http://kidshealth.org/en/teens/stress-fractures.html

http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/stress-fractures-the-basics

 

Is it the Hip Flexors?

Is it the Hip Flexors? https://youtu.be/6ktQwP9qnSc
Eugene and Karen discuss the hip flexors for gymnasts. www.BestSportsConditioning.com. #gymnastics

Actor… Added Info

Added page on this blog about Karen Goeller Acting careerweb-goeller-postcard-2016

Karen Peter Austin Noto – Do Gymnasts Eat?

Karen Goeller on Peter Austin Noto… Do Gymnasts Eat?

Yes, gymnasts eat, they MUST eat enough carbs for energy during the intense training. Some coaches push protein, but in reality, athletes need 55%-60% carbs. Without enough the body will use protein for energy. Where does it get that protein from? MUSCLE. Yes, muscles break down when the athlete uses protein instead of carbs for energy. Do you want your athlete to get weaker?
www.bestgymnasticstraining.com
#gymnastics #sports #gymnasts #training #newjersey

Fitness, Sports, Gymnastics Books…

Fitness, Sports, Health Books by Karen Goeller… Nice gifts! Print and Kindle versions on Amazon! http://www.amazon.com/author/karengoeller

books-fall2016

Karen Goeller Interview on Late Night TV

Karen Goeller on Late Night with Johnny P, June 2016.
Karen and Johnny discuss her books, acting career, sports training, and her favorite charity!

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